Private Consultations with JJ Luna


Should you wish to meet with me, I will ask you to send me a list of questions that you expect me to answer. Once I get the questions, I will decide whether or not a consultation is advisable.

Consultations that were refused

  • Gladys, 68, from Atlanta, was holding $424,000 in her bank account, the result of a sale of her ex-boyfriend’s home. She wanted to know how to hide this money not only from him but from the IRS!
  • Harry, 62, from Mountain View, California, asked if I could help him remain invisible while playing the stock market, and without resorting to a nominee. He was also buying properties with a low down payment and then flipping them. I refused this one because (a) I have no experience in the stock market nor do I recommend it, and (b) any time a mortgage is obtained through the normal channels, privacy is compromised.
  • Max, 30, from “somewhere in New England,” asked me to fly east to meet him at Boston’s Logan airport. “I will pay you a large amount of money,” he said, “to set me up so that no one can find me.” When I quizzed him for details, he admitted that he was a major scammer [penis enlargement pills] who was fearful of getting beaten up. I later followed his adventures on the Internet and also read a book that featured him. He certainly had the wherewithal to pay me “a large amount of money” but he was constantly on the run from his enemies. I never did hear if he was ever caught and beaten up but I certainly hope so!
  • Helen, 38, from Denver, contacted me for help to make herself invisible. However, she said she put down these three conditions:
  • “I must not move.
  • “I must continue to vote.
  • “I must continue to legally carry [i.e., a pistol].”
  • Given those restrictions, no one can help her!

Nevertheless, there are times when a consultation can be of benefit.  Here are three examples of clients I did agreed to help. (Names and details altered.)


Consultations that were accepted

  1. Wife not interested in privacy

Michael was in the process of selling both his business and his farm in northern Minnesota. He’d read and re-read How to be Invisible and was determined to move to a faraway state and disappear from the radar screen. His wife, however, could see no reason for the secret move. Michael knew that without her cooperation, he would be unable to succeed. I met with them in Minneapolis.


After a two-hour discussion, I suggested they talk things over and then we would meet again the following morning. At that point the wife seemed to be ready to go along, although I had some doubts.  However, I have since heard from Michael.  They are now in their new home and at least thus far, the wife is doing her part.


  1. In danger of future lawsuits

Elmer, 66, was a wealthy Texan who fell victim to a frivolous lawsuit. It was cheaper to pay off his adversary than to fight him in court, but Elmer resolved to never, ever, let that happen to him again. He went to Barnes and Noble, told the clerk he wanted some kind of a book to solve this problem, and was shown How to be Invisible.

He understood the book in principle but was fearful of making mistakes when he put the principles into practice. He contacted me four years ago, and we then met at a hotel in downtown Seattle. We spent two hours that afternoon discussing the various changes that would be advisable to make. The next morning I presented him with a written list of seven crucial steps to take.

Although I told Elmer to contact me with any future questions he might have, I have not heard from him since, so apparently all has gone well.


  1. Hounded unjustly by creditors

Santiago Martin, originally from Spain, built up a multi-million-dollar business in Atlanta from scratch. He later sold it to an investment group from Las Vegas. The investors ran their newly-purchased company deep into debt, falsified earnings (think Enron!), stripped the assets, closed the doors, and disappeared. When creditors failed to collect from the investment group, they tried to collect from Santiago.  Even though he had sold the company in good faith and was not responsible in any way for the resulting fiasco, he was known to have “deep pockets,” i.e., cash in the bank. Not a day passed without threatening phone calls or personal visits from collection agencies or even from the creditors themselves. Desperate for a solution, he arranged to meet me at the Fairmont Waterfront in downtown Vancouver, BC.

“My wife and I wish to continue to live in Miami,” he said, “but in peace, and invisibly if possible!”

Solution: The Martins, following my advice, spread the word that they were moving back to Spain. Then they put their home up for sale. Once it was sold, they secretly put everything into storage and then threw the mother of all going-away parties. Society reporters were on hand and pictures were published. Friends then accompanied them to the airport and saw them leave for Madrid.  Six months later they quietly returned to Miami and purchased a new home on the opposite side of the city by using a limited liability company A nominee then proceeded to get telephone, cable, and utilities hooked up in her name. As instructed, if the Martins happen to meet an acquaintance on the street, they say they are just back from Spain for a visit. (That was some five years ago. To the best of my knowledge, there have been no problems since.)


What will a consultation cost me?

From 2000 to 2015, I met clients in Seattle, Las Vegas, or Vancouver BC. My minimum price was $2950. In two occasions, when I had to travel to other locations on life-or-death decisions, I was paid $6,000. (Both parties are still alive today!) However, I am now in my late 80s and travel is difficult. For that reason I have slashed my fees as low as possible. In return, I will normally meet you only at my home in Burlington, Washington state. Here are two options:

  1. We will meet for up to two hours, for $750. Follow up via email, as needed.
  2. We will spend about two hours in the afternoon going over problems and possible solutions, and then another hour or so the next morning. The break between the two sessions gives you time to think up more questions, and it gives me time to review and meditate on which options will have the most merit. $1250.

Payment is 50% in advance.  However, the second half is paid only if you are totally happy with my help. If.  If not, do not pay me. (So far, all but one odd nervous woman have willingly paid the second half. A young man I met with one time said, “I was ready to pay you in full within the first half hour!”)


Exceptions as to location

If I am traveling anyway, I may consider meeting you along the way for no extra chargers. For example, I will be in British Columbia the latter part of October, and in the Canary Islands next summer.That depends upon where we meet, but in any case it will be more expensive.


How about a consultation via telephone or e-mail?

No. In order to do things right, I must meet you face to face.


What if I am unsure as to a consultation?

Send me an e-mail and outline your needs. Put “Consultation” in the subject line. JJL @ canaryislandspress [dot] com.

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